Therapy Box

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This year, as we prepare for back-to-school, many therapists are asking how to create therapy kits. Many parents are wondering how to set their child up for success in hybrid schooling. Many with kiddos that will attend full or part-time online school are trying to figure out how prepare for the upcoming school year.

As a pediatric occupational therapist, I have always come up with small occupational therapy boxes or “kits” to use in practice. I love to create a themed box or bin of OT activities and use that to work on a certain set of skills.

Occupational therapy boxes for using to work with kids in OT or at home to enhance learning through play.

THEMED THERAPY BOXES

In this upcoming school year, we will be using themed kits in our home to help my youngest learn and develop skills (handwriting, precision in cutting with scissors, reading, manipulatives and math). This was one way that I was able to hold her attention for schooling at home this past Spring, and we will continue with that strategy this school year.

Some ideas that help to hold a child’s attention and get them excited for therapy or learning include these therapy boxes based on a theme:

Back-to-School Therapy Kit

Toddler Color Bin

More themed occupational therapy kits

Mini-Stars Sensory Bin

Deep Blue Sea Book Sensory Bin

Each of these themed therapy bins takes a common theme and offers ways to build skills- fine motor skills, sensory exploration, and more- through play!

Having a boxed set of therapy materials allows children to explore tools that help them grow stronger as they explore and play. Kids love to “unbox” the materials and use them while they discover the therapy box materials.

It’s a great way to get kids excited about therapy this Fall when school and learning routines are out of the ordinary.

Themed occupational therapy kits or OT boxes for kids.

THERAPY BIN GIVEAWAY

That’s why I am SO excited to partner with Two Sparrows Learning Systems to bring you this OT for Me therapy box.

OT for Me is a subscription box designed and created by two pediatric Occupational Therapists and is a school-based OT box for activities to enhance kids’ academics through play.

The boxes are available as a single box purchase or in a monthly subscription model so that each month, you have a new therapy box arrive at your door. What a great way to get the kids excited about building developmental skills!

When you receive your box, you will be provided with activities for fine motor development, gross motor development, sensory play and family fun to enhance opportunities for growth & development.

Check out the items in this giveaway box…add these tools to your OT sessions or at home activities:

Occupational therapy giveaway items

OT for Me, is dedicated bringing families quality, hand-picked products and activities that have been tested and approved by the occupational therapy creators.

The therapy box aims to enhance kids’ individual skills and is cognizant that not all children develop at the same rate, so descriptions of the skills each product targets include strategies to make each activity harder or easier for that “just-right challenge”.

Each month, the therapy boxes are packed with new and exciting activities, meant to motivate children to “work” on developmental skills, all while having fun. Each box will always have an activity or product targeting the following 4 domains: Fine motor, Gross Motor, Sensory, & Academic/Family Fun- as well as other fun items! 

I’m so excited to partner with Two Sparrows Learning Systems on this OT for Me Therapy Box.

Colleen Beck, OTR/L is an occupational therapist with 20 years experience, graduating from the University of Pittsburgh in 2000. Colleen created The OT Toolbox to inspire therapists, teachers, and parents with easy and fun tools to help children thrive. As the creator, author, and owner of the website and its social media channels, Colleen strives to empower those serving kids of all levels and needs. Want to collaborate? Send an email to contact@theottoolbox.com.

340 thoughts on “Therapy Box”

  1. My ‘secret’ for getting kids to do their best in my therapy sessions is to do it with them. If i have an obstacle course, we take turns, or use a timer to see if we can beat our own scores. If we are coloring, I will do a portion, they the child will do part. It usually encourages them to not have to be working on something by themselves if they can see an end point, or if they are being physically challenged!

  2. I always try to make sessions fun. I will do the same thing they are doing and laugh when I mess up (sometimes not on purpose -I’m a bit of a clutz) and laugh about it to reinforce that it is no big deal to make a mistake and to keep on going.

  3. Always incorporate imagination, “mistakes” are happy accidents that can allow for laughs and growth, and provide a lot of options for certain skills (fine motor can be frustrating and switching it up can help with burnout). Goodwill and their board games are lifesavers.

  4. My trick is to not make it look like work! We can make it into a game and take turns. I do with with putting plastic coins into a dollar store toddler treat cup that has the multi-slit lid. It’s fine motor and turn taking all in one!

  5. I make therapeutic activities fun and exciting by finding what motivates the child and building off of that interest. If they love trains, we may write about trains, find fun train blocks to build with, build words with boxcars, etc.

  6. I try to make therapy fun by using items in new and exciting ways for my kiddos. The magic of learning to write your letters in play doh or creating a game out of materials found in my bag can be fresh and exciting for kids. I try to use a variety of items to keep motivation high and make tasks the most engaging as possible to work on necessary skills that might otherwise be boring. If it feels like it’s play and not work then I keep kiddos excited about therapy which helps it to be fun for me too!

  7. I offer don the activity with them, taking turns. I also find out their interests and try to incorporate them into our activities.

  8. I am always on the look out for fun activities and activity ideas. I make sure to learn about my students’ interests and provide choices to them about what we do. We play games and use our imaginations and make up stories as we do movement . Now during teletherapy I am also making more escape rooms and slides activities to work on certain skills.

  9. I aim to make therapy fun by including things the kiddos love and show that I’m excited to be with them!

  10. I try to make OT fun by incorporating games and crafts as much as possible. When kids are having fun they don’t even realize they are working. I try to have a new theme every week. They are always excited to see what the theme is each week. Sometimes I let one of my kids pick a theme for next week and I come up with activities to go along with it. It is also fun to ask my student what activities do they think we should do.

  11. For me, I think the key is to be playful yourself and to make things into a game as opposed to work. Also, if you know what motivates your kiddos and what their interests are, you can tie that into whatever their goals are, so that your activities will be fun that is tailored to them and focus on achieving goals at the same time. For example, if you are working on core strength and want a child to hold a prone position over a peanut ball, incorporate their favorite characters into a game or puzzle they can complete in that position. If you want them to be on their knees, working on a vertical surface, you can either give them a blank piece of paper and some crayons or you can go to the next level and give them the paw patrol or dinosaur themed coloring page that you know will really spark their interest and keep them going.

  12. I like therapy to be fun; often making the activity into a game! Being silly and using themes the kids are interested in is helpful!

  13. Whenever possible I try to make the task into a game and alternate hard tasks with more rewarding tasks.

  14. I learn about what interests each child and also follow their lead when we begin our session together. Then I layer my plan for what I want to accomplish into the session.

  15. I try to keep it special and new. A specific box that only comes out sometimes – not always available. And I try to vary what’s inside so it is new and exciting to use.

  16. I am a brand new grad and therapist, but I have a bit of experience with kids! My favorite thing to do is to try and turn everything into a game and also be silly! I love to make kids laugh and I know that they are engaged when they do. I’d really appreciate this prize as I do not currently own any therapy materials of my own. Thank you!

  17. I like to give my students the reigns during the sessions. I have the equipment laid out for them but they get to choose which order we do it in so they feel like they are in charge. It’s worked for me for 19 years!

  18. I make therapy fun by being silly and being on their level! If I’m having fun, they’re having fun!

  19. I try to make OT fun for the kids by having them making crafts using the skills the kids re working on- cutting, drawing, folding paper, beading or even making freindship bracelets. I also encourage them to make cards for their family members at the holidays.

  20. Add a theme for some pretend play as well! Kids love to engage when they’re zoo keepers, astronauts, or train conductors. Loosely weave this theme into all the activities of the session and the kids no longer view it as ‘work’ ?

  21. I try to listen to their interests/hobbies and incorporate them into sessions. I also try to make everything seem fun-more like play than work.

  22. Students are motivated to try an activity when I show them pictures of of my cat doing a variety of activites I may ask them to do. Pictures I have used: Miss Kitty : sitting on my computer with her paws stretched out as if she is typing, sitting on top of wrting paper with a pencil in her hand, stretched out over the top of a ball, wrapped up in a blanket, batting a ball back and forth and recently-wearing a mask! Karen and Miss Kitty, OT assistant!

  23. I keep things fun by using their interests to choose activities, by offering them choices and challenging older kiddos to help plan activities b during the session.

  24. I turn everything into a game and provide lots of choice. I also try to work in my students’ most desired items as much as I can as a motivator. I have a student who loves the play kitchen, so we do fine motor, sensory, gross motor work themed around food. Another student loves working with letters, so we use letter beads, letter magnets, letters marked on the floor … We use letters in all different ways for activities to meet his goals.

  25. I always incorporate the child’s interests into my sessions. I work primarily with children with autism so many times I take the child’s lead and incorporate my therapy goals in whatever the child is interested in that day. If a child is having a difficult time with a task then we take turns. My biggest goal is to make the session fun for the child so he/she wants to come each time to therapy. It always helps me know I’m doing “my job” when my kiddos can’t wait to see me or give me a hug when it is their turn for therapy.

  26. Make everything play based to keep their interest. I also find that participating in the activity with them and making it a game keeps increases motivation.

  27. I like to make activities into games as well as incorporate as many senses as possible. I know that many of the students do not play as much so having fun is a must. I also make the activities fun by asking them to pick how they would do them differently.

  28. I think one of the best ways to make therapy fun is to connect to the child by finding something that interests them! If they love garbage trucks, do a craft where you cut out different shapes to make a garbage truck! If they’re struggling, use a preferred activity as a reward! If you find ways to connect with them, you can sneak in therapy without them even knowing!

  29. I like to incorporate the kids interests into sessions to ‘trick’ them into working. Making sure activities are challenging but not too challenging with a reward activity at the often works well. Being able to take the activity that the kids want to do and make them therapeutic is one of my favorite parts of the job.

  30. I make therapy activities fun and exciting for my kiddos by incorporating things they like such as a favorite cartoon character, tv show, or toys. I also do it with them to make it feel less like work.

  31. I LOVE doing themes! Not only does it keep the kiddos engaged but it helps me find new creative ways to help them meet those goals! The best is when they come in and make up their own game with my props while I kind of guide the “rules” to hit their goals.

  32. I incorporate choice and do activities along with my students. I work hard to create an encouraging, stress-free environment for them to practice in. I keep up on new ideas and try a big variety of them. I have lots of colorful tools for them to use.

  33. Try to alternate new games and activities, and choose themes related to students interest. I have some students that enjoy beating their own score (handwriting or for a warm up activity) and dice games.

  34. I like to make activities fun by finding out what the child’s interest is! It is important to incorporate their interest otherwise the child may not fully engage in the session. I also like allowing the child to pick an activity then the therapist will provide a choice. I enjoy incorporating games into the session as games promote turn taking, fine motor, and visual perceptual and motor skills.

  35. I always try and incorporate a theme I know my students are interested in! For example farm animals, a favorite character or show etc. I also think it’s important to incorporate multi sensory approach and do the activity with them too! When kids are having fun and see the adults having fun they don’t even realize they’re working!

  36. We try to add in student’s interest as well as rotate themes to keep students engaged. Changing themes or materials helps keep their attention when we are still working on the same skills.

  37. No matter the age of child, got to appeal to their interests and make activity fun and meaningful.

  38. I use a lot of pretending, play and humor. I try to incorporate things that the kids like into therapy, especially the rewards. (specific shows, characters, songs, etc)

  39. For me (as a final year OT student), granting the child an opportunity to exercise choice. So that they feel like their opinion is valued and heard in the therapy space. It adds to the creation of a space and comfortable space in therapy – where they feel confident enough to try, encouraged to try again and ultimately, empowered to actualize their full potential,

  40. Positive reinforcement works wonder with any child. Each acitivity that i design are based on the child’s level to do activity. Due to teletherapy kids are already in their confort environment so i try to make it more challenging and use the home resources as the tool. For eg: i had organised the lemonade activity where child had to follow the instructions like squeezing lemon then add two spoons of sugar and stirring it continuously for soemtime till sugar dissolves. If child performs well or atleast make an attempt to do the activity, i then alow them to choose their favourite activity as the next. This way it helps to build their sitting tolerance and attention to do the activity.

  41. At the heart of it, more than the goals of each session, playing and having fun is important to keeping kids engaged. Knowing their interests, their just right challenge, and being able to be silly while engaging in activities helps with keeping them motivated.

  42. I’m not an OT so I can’t answer the question. I’m interested in the giveaway as I’ve tried a different subscription box for my son and we like it but the couple months we’ve received don’t seem to have a lot of variation in products offered. It’d be great to try out another option.

  43. I always try to change things up. If they get bored I add tweezers or water or a different sensory element. Love these ideas

  44. Allowing them to use a favorite toy to watch their progress. For example, my son may have an obstacle course and his car does it then the car watches him do it.

  45. I think utilizing your therapeutic use of self to read, gauge, and interact with your kiddos is key. Having a terrific personality that can transform to meet each client where they are and to engage them in their various activities. Bringing them up or bringing them down or keeping them just right.

  46. I try to tailor each activity to my client’s interest. And I always incorporate play! I let my client’s choose 1-2 activities each session, because I firmly believe that I can make anything therapeutic and target goals 🙂

  47. I love incorporating things the child is interested in. Doing the activities with them is also a good way to engage them!

  48. Participating in the activities with the students – doing the gross motor movements, making the craft, writing your own sentence, etc; making mistakes or doing something incorrectly or silly on purpose so they can correct me

  49. Turn everything into a game or obstacle course! And incorporating child’s interests (sports, animals, or characters from shows)

  50. I like to do a game or craft that they get to take home which targets their goals. The kids love to do something fun and it helps us build a rapport because they are more relaxed while doing something fun.

  51. I think providing activities that align to the child’s interest is important. But if you can’t always align to their interests, presenting novel tasks often helps too.

  52. I incorporate or build off of their interests and follow their lead! For older children, I will sometimes introduce a competitive edge to the activity which has been very motivating and interesting to some of the children I have worked with.

  53. My secret is to try to keep it light. Maybe try to giggle and do something silly before we get started.

  54. I always theme activities with whatever the child is really interested in whether that be trains, Paw Patrol, dinosaurs, ect! Adding gross motor movement is also always a hit!

  55. Using themes and games. Keeping them moving by pairing core strength positions with fine motor activities.

  56. Make it fun! Interact with students. Use favorite items/objects. Let them explore activity before participating.

  57. By incorporating their interests and activities that are motivating for them. Then, being their “cheerleader.” So many of our kids feed off of our mood and energy; so, trying to keep my energy up helps to make activities fun and exciting for the kids.

  58. I try to incorporate the child’s interests as much as possible. I have a kiddo who loves dinosaurs so we do dinosaur animal walks, crafts, and heavy work and he is always super engaged!

  59. I find out their interests and then use songs, dance around, and make a fool of myself but hey, it keeps them engaged and motivated and when they see how much fun I am having, they want to join right in (most of the time)!

  60. I try to make therapy fun for my kids by talking with them about interests and hobbies and what they are enjoying most about their school day. Sometimes we ask each other silly questions. Keeping them engaged is key!

  61. Let them choose activities and then turn it into something therapeutic! That’s my favorite part of the job!

  62. You can turn ANYTHING into a game and get much better effort from students. I rarely do straight worksheets with my students, since I find they become bored with them and don’t focus as much. I use word dice to create sentences or boatd games where they need to create a sentence with the word they land on, etc.

  63. I find what the child interest are and try to harness that into sessions, making it a games, using their favorite character for coloring/cutting, visual scanning to find their favorite color/food. I have used many manipulatives to build their favorite things before writing about it, mad libs to make writing silly, and competitions to see if they can find my mistakes and correct them.

  64. I make therapy fun by making it a game and playing along. They have so much fun and open up more when the adult is also playing.

  65. This is easy, join in on the fun! My little will sit for longer periods of time if I get animated and make lots of noises and sing and just play with him! I’m always making new sensory bins for him and adding different items to them to keep the fun (and learning) going for a long time! Our current favorite is water beads! He loves feeling them with his hands and feet.

  66. Make it fun! Incorporate their interests. Laugh often and explain how mistakes are part of learning.

  67. I’m a classroom special education teacher and I colloaborate with my OT to keep our kids engaged and learning in all things sensory and motor. We implement motor breaks and brain breaks to get kids moving and organized. Having pre-made tool boxes for different OT skills and themes would be such a help in supporting kids and carrying over their OT objectives in a fun way! Keeping them moving, rolling and engaged is always the best way to learn for our class.

  68. I talk with the kids about Therapy being a team activity. My job is to come up with activities and ideas to help them learn to do things easier and better. Their job is to Always try their best. If we both do our jobs then we can get progress towards our goals. I try to incorporate a lot of games into this so that things are fun and they don’t realize how hard they’re working.

  69. Focusing on the child’s individual interests and incorporating play to “hide the work”. Having students interact with each other when providing OT in small groups.

  70. I like to incorporate the student’s interest into the activity. If the child likes Pokeman, then we may color a Pokeman picture or cut out a Pokeman.

  71. Make it a game or if in a small group make it a contest. I always do the activities with my students whether fine motor, gross motor, or visual motor. Also being excited that they come to therapy to increase participation.

  72. I try to turn everything into a game! Obstacle courses are some of my favorites! You can embed almost any activity into an obstacle course, plus also get the heavy work and additional benefits/skills of the gross motor activity!

  73. I try to use their interests whenever possible. Crafts, sports, video games, characters. Incorporating anything they may like even if it’s just cutting a line until you reach the superhero for example! I also like to do as much out of their seat as possible -unless that is one of their goals of course.

  74. I make OT as fun and exciting as I can by using the child’s interests to incorporate into therapeutic activities. If a kiddo likes superheroes, then I use them throughout the session (action figures as a motivator to transition to the OT gym, superhero obstacle course including “spiderman burpees” with me being the villian and the kiddos being the hero, coloring superhero coloring pages, cutting out a superhero mask, etc…). Another kiddo was obsessed with the Bear Hunt song and we used it in our obstacle courses. I always call what we do “play” too since that is what OT is all about, using the occupation of play to target skills. And getting on the floor and playing the kiddos is also key. I try not to do a lot of work sitting at the table as that feels like work. If I get on the floor and engage with them in use their interests then OT should be fun.

  75. I always try to add music and movement into every therapy session! It’s sure to get smiles and giggles! It definitely helped the students and I get through the difficult zoom sessions during the school closure! I miss hands on/ face to face direct therapy…..but music and movement make virtual OT more do-able!!

  76. To make therapy activities fun, I always make it into a game. Since play is a child’s occupation we need to be playful. They learn through play and are motivated through play to learn and work on new skills. Plus that just makes it fun for everyone!

  77. I make therapy fun by using the students interests to make the learning activity be fun. We often work together to complete the activity. I also try to incorporate movement or music into the activities.

  78. Keep session fun and make sure that whatever activity is presented is a “just right challenge” (not too hard and not too easy).

  79. Incorporating play into therapy! I want to create a fun environment that encourages participation! I love when kiddos get so involved they don’t even know they are learning/working on therapy because they are having so much fun!

  80. I try to make therapy fun by using the things I learn that they are interested in or enjoy and playing with the kids via imagination, games, crafts, and just having fun. Showing enthusiasm for them and their interests is key!!!

  81. I love bringing play into all my sessions…I love my Snakey puppet who is held together by various clothing fasteners. He in turn loves to eat letter and shape buttons fed with tongs once the child puts him all together. Making tying fun makes the learning happen easier.

  82. I make therapy fun for the kids by doing my best to get to know the child and what they like, and then tailor the activities specifically to them based on what I learn. I’ve found that even with the most simple activities, the children have to be interested in them to engage optimally.

  83. I always try to find out what they are interested in and like to do outside of therapy. If I can make the activities fit the theme or have them engage in that activity to work on their skills, it is a win-win for both of us! Also, I always make sure to play the game or complete the activity with the child.

  84. I do my best to learn the likes and motivations of my kiddos. I plan activities around this and change/modify activities frequently.

  85. We are all in together. It doesn’t feel so much like work when someone is doing things with you. We practice taking turns and enjoy the activities. I also connect the activities to topics the child enjoys.

  86. In order to keep my kids engaged and having fun, I always make sure to incorporate whatever their current interests are into our sessions. That often means I do a specific targeted task 10 different ways with 10 different kids using whatever they are interested in that day…Lightning McQueen, Buzz Lightyear, RoBlox, Ryan’s World, etc. Definitely keeps me on my toes and up to date on all the kid trends!

  87. I keep therapy interesting for the kiddos by really tailoring it to them. At the beginning of the year, I do a survey with the families to see what specific things their child likes. I try to stock up on these items and bring them out slowly to introduce the student gradually to the item that I know engages them. I rotate the items to keep things interesting and so the students doesn’t become dependent on any one thing. Thanks for all you do! I love this site!

  88. I make up songs for everything! I have songs for learning to write your name, cutting, coloring, etc. You can change the words to any simple children’s tune to match the activity. This also helps to reinforce the concept with kids in their memory.

  89. I always try to incorporate new ways to do things to keep it exciting and always include a fun fine motor game for them to work for. My students also love to get stickers and/or stamps at the end of the session.

  90. How do you make therapy activities fun and exciting for kids?
    I incorporate their interests into activities, choose activities that are based in play, and participate in the activity with them (e.g., taking turns, making my own craft, etc.)

  91. Present it with a smile on your face. If it’s not a preferred activity, I do a First (what I’m asking) and Then (what they like to do). Like go across the monkey bars (challenging) then jump on the trampoline. Incorporate their interests to make it fun.

  92. I ask parents what the child is into at home (from free activities, games, to TV shows) and I incorporate these findings into my sessions.

  93. Who doesn’t love to open a box and get something new inside? It is important to change things up and keep things new and exciting!

  94. We make a big deal about them trying things that usually older children might do or something that not everyone gets to do. We try to make it as special as we can.

  95. I like games and switching up activities from week-to-week. The more variety, the less chance kids have to get bored.

  96. I like making things into games! I incorporate dice a lot, having the kids roll for a number or color to complete activities.

  97. You have to be silly! Kids love to see adults goof off. Get on their level and do everything they are doing. They are way more likely to participate this way.

  98. I make them fun and exciting by incorporating their favorite themes into session and building the session around it.

  99. I strive to make each activity game like. Engage in the task with the student and keeping in mind their interests and likes.

  100. Not to steal Jennys comment, But I totally smile ALOT, give them a choice, actually as many choices as I can incorporate in order to accomplish an IEP goal and end with a YOUR choice of game or activity for the last 5 minutes of our time together.

  101. Find out what they are interested in and use those “themes” for activities. Change it up, play alongside them. Show that mistakes are Ok by making mistakes yourself.

  102. I work hard to make therapy fun. I can be silly. When I work in the classroom, this definitely helps the whole group of them. I use different voices and intonation in that setting in particular. Definitely engage my students through play activities. I like to have fun and look at interests in order to engage my students.

  103. I like to play to each child’s interest! If they like dinosaurs then we’ll do dinosaur themed worksheets, feed the dinosaur fine motor activities, dinosaur movement activities etc. Of course when holidays come around who doesn’t like a Halloween or Christmas themed activity! I feel like the “theme” takes it from blah to wow!

  104. I love to do activities along with the kids! Of course, I am not very good at the activities 😉 so they have to help me or show me how to do them. Using high interest topics/favorites usually get pretty quick buy in (e.g. relate the activity to legos, Star Wars, Superheros, Minecraft, etc.)

  105. I base activities off the interests of the child. I make activities play-based or incorporated into the routine so the child doesn’t think they are working. I also alternate difficult activities with an easier activity or a gross motor activity to make it more fun.

  106. Incorporating themes and ideas based on the child’s interest. I love multi-step projects where the students can work on a variety of skills that results in something they can take home to show or give a sibling or parent/caregiver or give to their teacher. Games within an OT group are also very fun and engaging.

  107. I believe building rapport with the child is the number one tool for making activities and therapy fun. I learn a lot of about the child and base activities off of their favorite toys, tv shows, hobbies etc. I also believe I have successful and more engaging therapy sessions when the child trust me as a therapist and friend. I like to do a lot of gross motor in the beginning of the session and end with table top work! thank you again for all of your tools, information, and advice !

  108. I think the most important thing is to be flexible and meet a kid where they are. If the child is focused on a certain toy or object, incorporate it into the session. Trying to fight against that to stick rigidly to your plan just results in meltdowns!

  109. Lots of pretend play, including what is of interest to the students! All students have areas of interests and/or hobbies, so I always incorporate that into my session, that way it is both fun and functional for them!

  110. If I act like it is the funnest thing they usually will come over and join me. I try to connect it to their current interests and when it is on their ability level where they can be successful before being challenged they love all the different items I have. Would love to have individual boxes!

  111. I make therapy fun by connecting activities to the child’s current interests, and making sure that it is the right level of difficulty so that the child will feel successful!

  112. Incorporate their favorite toys/characters! This is a great motivator and the theme can keep things fun. Another way to help make the sessions child centered is to let them have *some* control- let them choose the order of preselected activities! Take turns choosing what’s next!

  113. I always start with movement activities which I find interests most kids and I try to incorporate one their interests, whether it just be by saying let’s do some super hero yoga moves or let’s cut out some princess pictures etc…I always find a way to make the activities interesting to them. There is always a way to be creative in your language or visually to gain a child’s interest.

  114. I work in an Early Start program through home visits (now virtual home visits) for children under the age of 3 years. For this age group and this model of services I make therapy fun by modeling, coaching, and facilitating activities with the whole family. Children have so much more fun when their siblings get involved and siblings have fun too. Children are most motivated and animated with their parents and it is often extra fun when dad can get involved.

  115. I try to incorporate their favorite theme or character (i.e. Dinosaurs, trains, Mickey Mouse, etc) as a motivator, especially with non preferred tasks. Once kids finish a non preferred or therapists choice task, they get a short break (1-2 minutes) to play with something of their choice, which also works on turn taking.

  116. I like to incorporate things they are interested in into the sessions, such as a favorite character or movie. I also like to do the actiivties with the kiddos and have competitions to see who can do it longer, quicker, faster, etc., and kids usually love to compete against their therapist! 🙂

  117. obstacle courses, allowing the children to pick between a choose of activities , working for a game that they like, visual schedule of tasks

  118. I use board games to focus on skills- VP, FM, strengthening etc and often Play while prime on floor and supported on elbows.

  119. Pediatric OTA! I love this! Always love this website and refer many families to check it out too!

  120. This sounds like so much fun! I rotate materials and activities (usually themed) to keep interest high.

  121. Been providing “kits” to families for teletherapy services. This would be fun for me to have!!

  122. I really struggle motivating my son to do fine motor activities because the challenge turns him off. I’ll try to motivate him by talking about characters in books we’ve read that overcame challenges and didn’t quit. Sometimes I’ll just sit on the floor and do the activity myself and he’ll walk over to check it out and start on his own. But the minute I give guidance or feedback, he stops. I just have to sit and be quiet. That’s my challenge! He loves getting Highlights in the mail and I think a special delivery for him would be motivating and intriguing.

  123. I am still a student so I am still trying to learn how to make the activities fun. One thing I do like to do is let them pick something they would like to do and then adapt it meet their goals.

  124. Being playful & silly, using song & movement to make activities fun. Having the child engage with preferred toys or ax to increase their interest & presenting materials in new ways.

  125. I try to make any activities as fun as possible using play. It is so hard for children to some tasks at least if it is fun we have more chance of them engaging.

  126. Make it fun! Change it up! Be creative! Get to know your students and their likes and dislikes. If it is a task that they don’t find fun, give them something motivating to work for.

  127. Therapy needs to be fun! I try to use a variety of activities and items to engage my students. We even do some baking and of course making Slime! The kids can then take home their creations and use them over and over again.

  128. I love to play right along with them, laugh, and be silly. Everyone wants their ‘work’ to be fun!

  129. I try to tailor activities to the child’s interests and strengths. I also try to make the activities into games or competitions.

  130. I try my best to always change up what we do in therapy so they don’t get bored. I also like to ask what their interests are and try to incorporate them into sessions! I have some friends who love Avengers, so we do avengers puzzles, avengers creative writing prompts, and avengers “walks”, a new take on animal walks! “Fly like Captain America! Stomp like Hulk!” etc.

  131. Meet them where they are. Enter into their world and figure out what the just-right challenge can be in that scenario.

  132. I have created centers in my room for pretend play. The kids play while incorporating fine motor, visual motor and sensory skills, they love it!!

  133. I try to use items that fall into the same genre items that they are interested in. (Dinosaurs, Mario, Mickey and Minny, Etc.)

  134. I try yovstarr with an easy fun activity that they have already mastered before moving on to the more challenging tasks. I try to incorporate their interests into the activities. Whenever possible I have everything set out that we are going to work on that day and they get to choose the sequence of activities.

  135. During an evaluation, I really like to get to know what hobbies and interests the child has before deciding how to shape each session. I always like to mix the session with ice breakers, movement breaks, and fun games to target our goals. I also like to think what the child thought of each activity, if they are able to communicate that, in order to better shape my future sessions.

  136. I try and make therapy session fun by really focusing on the specific kiddo’s interests! The most fun thing is doing something that you really enjoy and that feel personalized to you. I make sure that I still imply a challenge and I’m not just giving in to their preferences, but that’s a really great way to get a kiddo out of their comfort zone as well; incorporate something they really like (dinosaurs, paw patrol, music, play schemes, etc.)

  137. I try to change things up as much as possible. I try to get them up and moving while doing a fine motor task that they might be all reading doing in class as per goal.

  138. Therapy is always fun when you make it into a game. Thanks for the chance to win the amazing giveaway

  139. I usually bring in a big motivator for them and make it therapeutic to match my goals and what they are working on. For example, I’ve been using my old Pokemon cards with kids to play memory or matching games.

  140. I’m not an OT, but I do OT work with my son at home. My son is really into anything with wheels so I try to incorporate cars and trucks into our activities.

  141. I keep my sessions fun with motor centers before and after the ‘yawn’ handwriting seat work. It helps motivate getting that work done.

  142. I like to incorporate play and creativity as much as possible and create an environment where humor and laughter are encouraged. I also let my kids know that mistakes are mandatory!!

  143. I love playing games with the kids. I will look up some minute to win it games which usually work on some great skills. They like competing against me and their peers.

  144. Someone needs a therapy session. They need to work hard to get the full benefit of the session. Stop right there! Work is a four letter word and not appropriate if we want the person to gain maximum benefit. Let’s change that word to play. Let’s design sessions so they are relaxing, playful, invigorating, now we are working towards maximum engagement.

  145. I tailor the therapy activity to what they are interested in at the time. The kids always enjoy the activities more when I play or do the activity with them.

  146. Don’t be afraid to be big (actions, emotions, etc) and silly! Acting like you’re having a blast can make almost anything fun for kids.

  147. Therapy is always fun when you add components of interest to the child. It can be action figures that they adore or just acting silly to get nice engagement and focusing.
    Of course reward charts help as well!

  148. I like to add in a little surprise and a little predictability into the sessions. I also incorporate the individual student’s likes and interests while trying to expose them to new things.

  149. Kids learn through play, so all “therapy” is play!! Keep them in suspense during a game, show an exaggerated excited face.

  150. I have themes for the week or month, and like to utilize scented utensils and tactile play into the activities.

  151. I love getting to know the child and understanding their interests so I can create activities that are motivating while working on important skills that allow them to reach their full potential while staying engaged!

  152. I go with the child’s interests and base the activities on that and have a can do attitude

  153. To make sessions fun with my son I join in completely. I do all the activities he is doing, I make mistakes and just have fun. As much as possible I follow Jacobs lead and give him the control in what we do by providing choices.

  154. Centre it around the child’s interests where possible. If its not working, stop and try something different you can go back to it another time.

  155. I either do it with them, racing, an activity where I know they will enjoy because I’ll make sure it involves cars, princesses, Spider-Man, etc and also will work on their OT goals

  156. I use seasonal themes. I have folders of activities, crafts, yoga, etc for many times each year. I pull out the season or holiday, and give the students a choice of activities (appropriate for their goals and level…. ). Typically, the students have something they can bring home. At the ned of the year, the students make a “OT Yearbook” with all the activities they have done. If I can include pictures too, great!

  157. I use seasonal themes, happy and/or calming background music, reinforcement with preferred activities/games, and try to provide alot of fun sensory input and limit amount of tabletop/seated activities

  158. I try to make things fun by incorporating interests and participating in active, movement activities with my students

  159. I love to do crafts or play games to address skills in a fun way! I also try to tie in their interests wherever possible and just be silly with them! During teletherapy, I made therapy fun by incorporating my dog into sessions whenever possible! I also whipped out my Minnie Mouse ears and wore them for a few sessions!

  160. To keep my students and young clients engaged, I always try to have fun games to play and lots of manipulatives for their hands and body. I am an active participant in whatever we are doing and never just sit, direct and watch. If I engage and play, then the child will engage in play. Being silly and on their level is also very motivating.

  161. I include activities that appeal to the child’s interests and build my activities around those. I set up a routine for my session and find that if we follow our schedule and end with an item of high interest, the child continues to be motivated. We have fun together!

  162. I always try to make a game out of it and have fun with the kiddos. I do the activities with them so they see it is fun.

  163. I always try to make a game out of it and have fun with the kiddos. I do the activities with them so they see it is fun.

  164. I am a soon to be OT, and have finished my last FW in pediatrics and plan on applying to pediatric jobs! I always made sure to make my sessions engaging for the kiddos by using their favorite characters/ shows/ and colors and letting them “pick” what we were doing. I always gave them options of what to pick from and just rerouted the game to focus on what we were working on. I always had a stash of themed games and activities per characters like super why, paw patrol, and more.

  165. I am a soon to be OT, and have finished my last FW in pediatrics and plan on applying to pediatric jobs! I always made sure to make my sessions engaging for the kiddos by using their favorite characters/ shows/ and colors and letting them “pick” what we were doing. I always gave them options of what to pick from and just rerouted the game to focus on what we were working on. I always had a stash of themed games and activities per characters like super why, paw patrol, and more.

  166. Depending on the student, I will use a “game board” to help them show their progress and incentivize them for wining a prize. I also like to switch individual and group sessions, by saying let’s two sessions where we do this work and then on our third session, we’ll set 15 minutes for a game or other fun activity.

  167. I use play-based activities or games, and try to cater to individual interests when possible. Always grading the activity for the child to feel success.

  168. Typically I find out what the child is interested in/what’s most motivating, then come up with specific activities to pull at these interests. I also love to have a theme or use the holidays to make crafts/games.

  169. I use the child’s interest to engage and use the child’s lead to guide therapy to work on their goals while still having fun!

  170. Talk to the student and find out their interests and use that to work on their goals. I’ve made crafts with robots and gardens that they can take home and are really proud of. If we have handwriting goals, we can create stories and write about what they made! I also bring in things like old fashioned typwriters or nesting dolls that they may have never seen to create interest.

  171. I incorporate a lot of movement in between fine motor tasks. I choose fun projects to make and have fidgets available as well as sensory breaks.

  172. I always start off by asking my students what they did over the weekend or what their favorite characters are. I always try to incorporate something the love doing or their favorite characters into therapy. I love trying to bond with my students. Like I have one student who loves horses and dogs and so do I, so we try to focus activities with those themes for fun

  173. I try to make all my sessions fun by including things the students enjoy. I also try to end with a fine/visual motor game they can earn.

  174. I try to do themed activities based on what they’re interested it. Most things can be adapted to make into a related activity. We can add numbers or coloring or gross motor or favorite characters.

  175. Being apart of each game and activity! Creating themed activities or even sessions and just being silly.

  176. I like to get the kids involved by asking “what else do you think we can do with this?” And letting their interests and imagination lead the play while I take a back seat. I will try to throw some fine motor skills in by grading the activity harder LOL.

  177. I have always made therapy into a game with turn taking and choices–
    It is important to keep things exciting to keep their attention by incorporating their interests!!

  178. I try to listen to what they are talking about that is fun, or watch them in their play to see what is interesting them and go from there. I find that if I incorporate their interest in whatever activity it becomes a hit. If I have missed it, then by watching them with the activity I can usually see where it could be tweaked to make it more interesting for them.

  179. Making sure to incorporate their interests! And being engaged when you present and do the activity with the kids too!

  180. Making sure to incorporate their interests! And being engaged when you present and do the activity with the kids too!

  181. I love to get down on my kids’ level literally! I do the same activity with them side by side or if we are in a group, each kid gets to lead one activity which is always very fun. Each session I start out asking about their day, what their plans are for the weekend and just listen to whatever they want to tell me about. This sets up a good relationship and kids love that personal one-on-one interest I take in them before we dive into the work. BIGGEST tip is to make it not look like work. Letting them choose how to do something allows the m to tap into their creativity!

  182. I start by finding what is motivating to the client. I believe that any activity can be play based! I also find that having the client choose that activity makes it more engaging 🙂

  183. For my children I have them paint on construction paper. Oddly enough they can sit thru this exercise and go on for hours. It allows them to see each other’s creativity and helps them interact as siblings that because of age difference they typically don’t enjoy playing the same thing or same activities this is one that all 4 enjoy.

  184. Kids are usually coming in with ideas but I love to facilitate how to build an obstacle course for executive functioning, motor planning, sensory fun and more.

  185. How do I make therapy activities fun and exciting for kids? – I find out what motivates them and excites them, and I build off of their interests! Kids also tend to love sensori-motor play so can’t go wrong there!

  186. I try to make difficult tasks a competition to see who can score the most points or do something the fastest. I also try not to repeat activities so they don’t get bored. Using varied activities such as crafts, incorporating videos or online games, gross motor fun, and tactile/sensory activities also help keep my kids engaged.

  187. I try to make things fun and exciting for the students I work with my tapping into things they like and enjoy, then build off of that. Using functional tasks such as projects also helps keep them motivated.

  188. Personalize the activity as much as I can to match the kid’s interest. Also I try to time the activity during the school day so they aren’t missing out on another activity they love.

  189. Try to incorporate their interests into the therapeutic activity and give choices so they feel in control.

  190. I pay close attention to their preferences for toys and materials and make every effort to incorporate these items into work on targeted skill development.

  191. I try to have a upbeat and encouraging personality. I spend time knowing my kiddos so I can provide tasks with themes that they enjoy or challenging. I want the kiddos to have fun with the work that I give them.

  192. I like to participate in the activities with them to increase engagement and add more “play” into what we are working on, or try to have them partner up with another kiddo for an obstacle course etc.

  193. I try to make things fun and engaging by playing to my student’s interests and making games that we play together using our imaginations.

  194. I like to keep sessions fun by making games out of each step. I keep sessions short and fun. I also try and incorporate gross motor while doing fine motor when possible. Mixing it up makes the time fly and kids have fun.

  195. Through games, puzzles and playing together! Using themes as well as the child’s interest and playing together.

  196. You make it as play based as possible and use different games and sensory motor activities to keep them engaged while targeting the skills you need to target. Think outside the box! Give them choices.

  197. I look for what the child is interested in and finds motivating, whether it be Thomas the Train, sports, superheroes or Disney princesses. I either incorporate this into the actual activity or use it as something to do after our work is done.

  198. It is so important to make therapy fun for the kids so they are excited to come back and motivated to work with you. This is why it’s crucial to build rapport and find out what motivates each individual child and use this in your sessions for the best outcome. For example, I have some kids who like competition so I will try to make it a race to get them to do something. I had a child recently who had difficulty transitioning (due to behaviors) from the last activity to putting their shoes on in preparation for exit to the lobby. He would run toward the sensory gym and not listen to me. I ran over to my shoes and was like “Hurry, hurry! It’s a race” and he immediately ran over and put his shoes on. It’s almost like a type of psychology trying to get the kids to do what you want them to do! Definitely takes learning some tricks!

  199. It is so important to make therapy fun for the kids so they are excited to come back and motivated to work with you. This is why it’s crucial to build rapport and find out what motivates each individual child and use this in your sessions for the best outcome. For example, I have some kids who like competition so I will try to make it a race to get them to do something. I had a child recently who had difficulty transitioning (due to behaviors) from the last activity to putting their shoes on in preparation for exit to the lobby. He would run toward the sensory gym and not listen to me. I ran over to my shoes and was like “Hurry, hurry! It’s a race” and he immediately ran over and put his shoes on. It’s almost like a type of psychology trying to get the kids to do what you want them to do! Definitely takes learning some tricks!

  200. I like to keep activities focused on the current season/holiday so that it keeps things fresh, not falling into a rut of repeating activities.

  201. I like to collaborate with other service providers and classroom teachers to gain as much insight into the child’s preferences and individual differences to then use that information, in collaboration with the others, to create activities that will be motivating but also challenging for the students. Most of my students respond well to hands on, typically sensory based, interventions.

  202. I like to collaborate with other service providers and classroom teachers to gain as much insight into the child’s preferences and individual differences to then use that information, in collaboration with the others, to create activities that will be motivating but also challenging for the students. Most of my students respond well to hands on, typically sensory based, interventions.

  203. My son is super into imaginative play and telling stories. Any time I can get him to tell a story while we are “working” makes it fun for him.

  204. I always have my bag next to me with the next activity ready to replace the existing activity. If I think the current activity is not working despite my various interventions, I bring out the new activity before taking away the old one. The child has no time to engage in something other than what is prepared as a therapy activity. If a child is unable to engage or show any interest, it may be time for a movement break with balls, targets, scooters, running, hopping, skipping, walking backwards out in the hall.

  205. As a new paediatric OT, I aim to guide the therapy sessions according to the child’s interests and let them take the lead! Using engaging activities and play to keep it fun and exciting!

  206. To make an activity fun, I create the activity with items I know they love so it makes it seem like play. Doing the activity with the child will also make it seem more like a game than work. Changing up activities so they don’t become stale is also crucial to keep therapy fun!

  207. To make an activity fun, I create the activity with items I know they love so it makes it seem like play. Doing the activity with the child will also make it seem more like a game than work. Changing up activities so they don’t become stale is also crucial to keep therapy fun!

  208. Relationship is key. Start there and stay focused on the child’s reaction to keep the challenge/fun level in the just right zone! Kids love to tell me what to do so if I can add that they are happy!

  209. A different theme with different items keeps it fresh, interesting, and encourages engagement out of curiousory.

  210. I make therapy sessions fun and exciting for kids by doing activities of preference and incorporating their likes every session! I also love to play music and have free choice at the end.

  211. I always meet a child where they are at and offer lots of choice to ensure I create safety. Once kiddos feel safe and non threatened they always open up and can truly find true joy in what we are doing!

  212. I always meet a child where they are at and offer lots of choice to ensure I create safety. Once kiddos feel safe and non threatened they always open up and can truly find true joy in what we are doing!

  213. I take an interest inventory at the beginning to find out what my students’ interests/likes are, i.e. favorite characters, toys, etc.. I then try to plan sessions to include those interests to make things more fun and interesting. I also try to provide several activities during a session to keep their attention when necessary.

  214. I try to keep my sessions fun by doing the games and activities with the kids, building rapport by being their friend and sometimes matching their energy level needs!

  215. Knowing their interests in characters and toys and start with activities incorporating their favorite things to increase engagement. Once engagement And rapport is established then the activity can be scafffolded. Using humor and using various voices also helps.

  216. I always try to make therapy activities into a game and let the cold use their imagination to put their own creative spin on it

  217. I really enjoy making things fun. I encourage making funny faces when something is frustrating or seems difficult. I also make funny faces with them! We make up songs and fun rhymes. I do the activities with them, and make “mistakes” to show them it’s OK if you don’t always get something right the first time.

  218. I love motivating children to go through obstacle courses and completing tasks with dog treats that they can give to my dog once they finish (animal assisted therapy). It’s also fun to make the activities into a theme where you’re creating a story and collecting berries, saving animals, etc.

  219. By knowing the child’s interests and what motivates the individual, using therapeutic use of self to make therapy fun, and by modeling for parents how to use play to address children’s needs. Play is the key! Music or singing songs during an activity can also enhance therapy fun!

  220. By knowing the child’s interests and what motivates the individual, using therapeutic use of self to make therapy fun, and by modeling for parents how to use play to address children’s needs. Play is the key! Music or singing songs during an activity can also enhance therapy fun!

  221. Being thrown into teletherapy like most therapists this spring was a challenge. This blog was a lifesaver for ideas and information! Parent coaching and creating simple sensory break ideas using home materials was my go to for teletherapy! A creative challenge!

  222. I base it on their interests and also incorporate movement bc my children are already sitting all day!

  223. I base it on their interests and also incorporate movement bc my children are already sitting all day!

  224. I like to let the kids have choices in the activities we do. Letting them decide a certain toy to use during the activity or help me with deciding how to make up obstacle courses or other movement activities.

  225. Get to know the child and understand what they like to do and plan activities around their interests. Everything should be play for them and seem like a game, if you’re not having fun then they aren’t either.

  226. New theme each week!! It helps prevent you from getting stuck in a rut and doing the same thing over and over.

  227. I incorporate games, the child’s interests, and a little humor to make things more fun. I always participate in the game or activity with them too!

  228. I use fun and laughter, silly faces and voices, silly jokes and games. I participate with them in all activities.

  229. I always try to use any perseverative interests they might have! Dinosaurs, superhero’s whatever it is, incorporating them always makes it fun and keeps them engaged!

  230. I try to make it fun! I’m always doing the activities with them, and I ALWAYS make up silly songs about whatever it is we’re doing and sing it while we do it!

  231. I always start with movement/sensory activities and make a fun game out of it. I sing made-up songs about the activity or directions as we’re engaged and, of course, I’m doing the activity right along with them.

  232. I try to plan activities that are fun using themes that interest the child with movement and and directional concepts; obstacle courses!

  233. I try to plan activities that are fun using themes that interest the child with movement and and directional concepts; obstacle courses!

  234. I have found that the best way to make therapy fun is to play together. I do all the activities and games along with my kiddo. I also utilize things he really likes to play with – like music, lights and his ipad.

  235. Wow! So many amazing ideas! I have been using a lot of OT Toolbox activities or jumping off of the ideas I find here and incorporating kids interests. Teletherapy is particularly challenging for younger kids but I have been enjoying the parent teaching that goes with it and they have been discovering fun family activities to do based on our sessions. Generalization as a silver lining to screen based therapy!

  236. Wow! So many amazing ideas! I have been using a lot of OT Toolbox activities or jumping off of the ideas I find here and incorporating kids interests. Teletherapy is particularly challenging for younger kids but I have been enjoying the parent teaching that goes with it and they have been discovering fun family activities to do based on our sessions. Generalization as a silver lining to screen based therapy!

  237. we make games like olympics where students are motivated to do well. I try and use engaging activities that motivate them to play without realizing that they are working!

  238. I try to be child led and allow the child to choose their activity with a choice from a couple of items or games that can be goal oriented yet fun. Sometimes the child (and parents) don’t even know we are working on things like fine motor or hand eye coordination because it just looks like playing 🙂 (but isn’t that the point!)

  239. The best way to make it fun is incorporate their interests! Dinosaurs, cars, Dr Seuss, minecraft, etc. And to learn about the movies, tv shows, video games that are current so you can have a conversation with kids about it — although I wish they were more unplugged but that’s just not the case in today’s society.

  240. I always work developmental tasks into play activities. Most weeks we have “therapy themes” which are engaging and fun for kids, from Shark week, Superhero week, Down on the Farm, etc. We dress up, play games, and all therapy tasks are designed around the theme of the week. It keeps kids interested and engaged without tasks becoming boring and frustrating for them.

  241. I act silly. Some of my younger students get a laugh out of me “being a clutz” like spilling items and then they help me pick them up (great fine motor activity) AND IT IS WORKING ON A LIFE SKILL AT THE SAME TIME.

  242. playing along with them and taking turns. I always ask “what else do you think we could do with this” or “is there another way to do this?” Gets their imagination flowing – great way to get them and keep them engaged in creative ways. I usually end up learning something new too.

  243. I love to use games and incorporate writing or drawing, students willingly engage in a task they often struggle with in class. For example using a scavenger hunt, but give them lines to write to object they found.

  244. Try to incorporate it into daily task or make it into a game, so it doesn’t feel like it’s work! I also give 2 options to choose from, so my kids feel like they are making the choice to do a certain type if activity!

  245. Try to incorporate it into daily task or make it into a game, so it doesn’t feel like it’s work! I also give 2 options to choose from, so my kids feel like they are making the choice to do a certain type if activity!

  246. I like to make therapy fun by engaging in activities with the kiddos! Whenever a child is hesitant to do a task, it always helps to be goofy and show them how it’s done. I use various reinforcement strategies such as giving their favorite candy and obtaining stickers to work toward a prize. Making the activity fun and silly usually helps a child come out of their shell and have fun throughout the whole session.

  247. I like to make therapy fun by engaging in activities with the kiddos! Whenever a child is hesitant to do a task, it always helps to be goofy and show them how it’s done. I use various reinforcement strategies such as giving their favorite candy and obtaining stickers to work toward a prize. Making the activity fun and silly usually helps a child come out of their shell and have fun throughout the whole session.

  248. I always try to make the session fun by selecting activities based on their interests and motivation. Arts and craft are fun both for me and the kids. And lots of verbal praises and verbal responses to their actions seem to help them engage in the activities.

  249. I always try to make the session fun by selecting activities based on their interests and motivation. Arts and craft are fun both for me and the kids. And lots of verbal praises and verbal responses to their actions seem to help them engage in the activities.

  250. I use common items such as play dough and we work to imagine that it is something they are interested in.

  251. For gross motor therapy we always draw fun lines or stick tapes and make the kids jump over it or hop on the line in straight, zigzag, on one leg… For fine motor therapy we always learn to cut fun shapes, make lovely puzzles, use fingers for painting, sand, salt for making lovely designs… Fold interesting shapes…

  252. For me, it’s all about relationship. When kids know you’re genuinely excited to see them and care about them, any activity takes on new life. And smiles, perky/silly voices, and body language that conveys “I’m so glad you’re here with me!” go a long way.

  253. I take time to learn about their interests and motivators and always incorporate play into what we do. Crafts and games are a great way to get kids involved and the best therapy is when they don’t know they’re doing therapy at all – and think we’re just having fun!

  254. Find out what the kid is into and incorporate that into the session, change it up every now and then 🙂

  255. Therapy activities are always fun when you involve the skills they like to work on and involve their interests! Working with scissors is always a big thing for my kiddos!

  256. Definitely finding the interests, i´ve found that is the key. And also keeping a great attitude, relax, like im not working, just enjoy the time, they love it and me too

  257. I make therapy fun by incorporating their interests, and making things into a game. I also like to introduce new and different games that they don’t even realize they are working on some skills that are difficult for them.

  258. I choose a them for the month and plan activities around that and have a variety of activities planned throughout the month.

  259. I make a session fun by getting right down with my children and play together. I give plenty of praise and use music.

  260. I love having them come up with a theme, or an idea that’s intrinsically motivating. From there, the sky’s the limit! I’ll incorporate equipment and supplies that support the child’s goals. There’s no end to the possibilities. For most of the kids, sensory experiences are part of the process.

  261. We try to find things our kiddo is already interested in, and add in a sensory piece to it. My child loves to make crafts, so we try to provide a lot of different types of materials for extra sensory input.

  262. We try to find things our kiddo is already interested in, and add in a sensory piece to it. My child loves to make crafts, so we try to provide a lot of different types of materials for extra sensory input.

  263. We do alot of OT work at home and day to day. Our son loves water so we often find ways to make bathtime more interesting by using bath colours, fizzies, bath slime etc and he absolutely loves it!

  264. I try to incorporate my student’s interest in worksheets or projects. Whether this be my color or content. My students also love doing projects incorporating their names.

  265. I incorporate my students’ interests in the various activities I give to them. I also incorporate movement and try to make each work a game for them.

  266. I try to make activities fun and exciting by finding what motivates the child and building off of that interest. Finding ways to keep the kids engaged is my biggest goal

  267. I try to make things fun for the kids by incorporating something they are interested in into the activity they are working on. For example, if we are working on cutting skills, I can use a cutting worksheet with some of their favorite cartoon characters.

  268. I find out what motives them best. Whether its letting them choose what they do first, making it a racing competition, allowing them to be all hands on (regardless of how messy they may get), encouraging to do their best so finished product could be gifted.

  269. I like to use play based activities, themes, games, and incorporating the child’s interests in therapy to make it fun and keep the child’s interest.

  270. I love to find ways to incorporate toys into our sessions. For example, the kids might use tongs or tweezers to manipulate toy dinosaurs or hatchimal figurines. Or I might have them hold a squinky in their two smallest fingers while they write or color. Or we might play a fine motor game, or use the dice game to work on handwriting. The more OT looks like playtime, the more the kids love it!

  271. My son has been struggling with fine and gross motor skills since he was diagnosed at 18 months for Autism/Asperger’s (low dexterity weakness). He has been getting Speech, OT and PT privately and as well as in his public school system. Early Intervention is so important. I was told that he may never talk! Tell the truth and shame the devil! He can communicate with me and others. God has a plan and whatever it is, keep moving forward. This would be excellent for him and it will keep him occupied during COVID-19. School is out due to this, so he can continue therapy at home!

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therapy boxes for occupational therapy activities